Researcher, professor and Franco-Ontarian advocate Caroline Andrew dies

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Condolences are pouring in from all corners of academia following the death of Caroline Andrew, Professor Emeritus at the University of Ottawa, a leading researcher on women and politics and a notable advocate for the Franco-Ontarian community.

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“We are sorry for her passing and we extend our condolences to the colleagues of her family and friends,” the Canadian Political Science Association wrote in a message posted Friday.

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Andrew was the first woman to chair the CPSA and, during a long career at the University of Ottawa, served as Dean of the University’s Department of Social Sciences and served as a Professor in the School of Political Studies and as Director of the Center for Administration.

The university described Andrew as “a nationally recognized authority on urban and feminist studies, as well as cultural diversity.”

“We regret the passing of our Professor Emeritus Caroline Andrew,” the University of Ottawa School of Political Studies wrote in a statement. “She had been closely involved with the university for more than 30 years. Her work in urban and feminist studies has shaped her national reputation. We offer our sincere condolences.”

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During a long career at the University of Ottawa, Caroline Andrew was Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences and served as a Professor in the School of Political Studies and Director of the Center on Governance.
During a long career at the University of Ottawa, Caroline Andrew was Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences and served as a Professor in the School of Political Studies and Director of the Center on Governance. Photo by Patrick Doyle /Postmedia files

Andrew was invested as a Member of the Order of Canada in 2015 for her academic research in cultural diversity, urban and feminist studies, and her civic engagement with non-profit and community organizations.

“Caroline Andrew is a leading voice in Ottawa academia and social activism,” reads her Order of Canada biography. “As a former dean of social sciences at the University of Ottawa, she co-founded the women’s studies program and is known for her research in urban and feminist studies. At the grassroots level, she has volunteered with organizations like the Ottawa Local Immigration Partnership and the Lowertown Community Resource Center to advocate for newcomers, women, and residents of inner-city neighborhoods. She has also championed civic initiatives that support better integration of immigrants, fighting crime and the language rights of Franco-Ontarians.”

Andrew received a Bachelor of Science in Political Science from the University of British Columbia in 1964, a Master of Social Science from Université Laval in 1966, and a PhD in Political Science from the University of Toronto in 1975.

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