What the census reveals about Trafford’s population in the last 10 years

The population of Trafford rose at a slower rate than the average for England as a whole in the 10 years up to last year’s census.

An initial round of results were published this week, with other rounds still to come.

According to these results, the population of Trafford increased from an estimated 226,600 to 235,100 – a rise of 3.8 per cent.

This a slower rate than the average for England as a whole, where the population increased from an estimated 53,012,456 to 56,489,800 – a rise of 6.6 per cent.

The population of 235,100 means Trafford is now the 75th most populous of more than 300 authorities across the country, down one place on the previous census.

It is also seventh in terms of population density in the north west of England, with the equivalent of around 16 residents on each football pitch-sized area of land. But this is next to nothing in comparison to Tower Hamlets in the capital, where there are the equivalent of around 112 residents on each football pitch-sized area of land.

Although the largest group in Trafford is people aged 40 to 44, the population is ageing, as some 17.6 per cent of people are over the age of 64, up 1.6 percentage points on the previous census.

But it is doing so slower than in England as a whole, where some 18.4 per cent of people are over the age of 64, up two percentage points on the previous census.

Responding to the results, Trafford Council leader Andrew Western said: “The figures revealed from the census give a detailed analysis of population and trends across Trafford and the rest of the UK.

“They show a number of factors including how our population has risen and how the rise compared to other parts of Greater Manchester.

“The information will help us to plan to deliver services to people who will need them the most and help to determine the allocation of financial resources.”

Other rounds of results are to include data on areas like education, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion and work.

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